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Jul182017

'I'm sorry to inform you...' What to do when you don't get the job

Job interview You’ve had an interview for your dream job. Now the nail-biting wait begins. You see an email drop into your inbox and start to read the words ‘thank you for coming to meet us. Unfortunately…’ and the sense of disappointment sinks in. The familiar rejection email. Dealing with the challenges of the job hunt can be tough, but it doesn’t have to dent your confidence. Rejection is by no means a sign of failure as now you can reflect and reconsider your strengths and weaknesses. But it takes a resilient mindset to be able to conquer these setbacks. Here are a few things you can do when you don’t a get a job offer, which will help get the ball rolling again for your job hunt.


Get Feedback
Naturally, you’re going to want to know exactly why you didn’t get the job, but this can be tricky. Many employers won’t reply to emails that ask for feedback, as they’re concerned over legal issues like discrimination or they simply might not have the time. Nevertheless, it’s essential to try and get in touch with the employer or your recruitment consultant to find out where you may have gone wrong. Ensure you send a follow-up email after an interview in a polite and professional manner and let them know it’s really important for you to hear their feedback. If you applied through a recruitment agency, it could be easier to receive feedback as we have long-standing relationships with employers. Always be open minded to any feedback so you can make improvements and try to have a thick skin!

Narrow your search
The job market is a competitive place, where many jobseekers feel they need to apply for every vacancy in sight. It can be easy to lose focus on your career goals due to the pressure of trying to land a job. Always be selective with where you apply, as there’s no point spending time shaping your CV and crafting the perfect cover letter for a job you’re not suited for. We would recommend that you don’t let job boards automatically send your CVs to any job. Always research the company thoroughly and find out as much as you can about its team and culture, before applying for a role.

Consult a career coach
Have you ever considered getting in touch with a career coach? They can help you address any issues that are holding you back from getting a job and it’s a great way to keep proactive and build confidence. You’ll be able to practice your interview skills with someone who can give you expert advice on how to improve, giving you an honest evaluation of how you communicate and present yourself. Also, they can help you on your search strategy and advise you on the best ways to target the most suitable jobs. If you can’t afford a career coach, why not ask your friend to ask you some frequently asked interview questions. There is something to be said for practicing your answers out loud rather than in your head.

Reflect on the positives
Remember, not every job is right for everyone! The perfect job is out there for you, so try to focus on the positives, even if it is just good interview experience. And remember, never take things personally. When you get turned down, it could be due to a number of reasons including team fit, ambition or technical skills. Take comfort in knowing it wasn’t the right firm for you at this time.

So, there are various ways to survive job rejection which will help you stay positive. Getting a no always hurts, but don’t let it derail your employment search. By following this advice, you’ll be able to turn rejection around and create more opportunities for success.

If you would like additional advice from a Cobalt recruiter, please contact your nearest Cobalt office.

Got any other top tips for dealing with job rejection? Let us know in the comments below.

You may also be interested in:
Cobalt's CV Advice
How to Nail Your Job Interview

This entry was posted on Tuesday, July 18th 2017 and is filed under Interview. You can subscribe to our RSS 2.0 news feed here.

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